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Posts Tagged ‘achieve’

MAXIMUM SUCCESS IS ACHIEVED IN STEPS

Posted by 104Inc.com on December 9, 2008

You’ve got to say, I think that if I keep working at this and want it badly enough I can have it. It’s called perseverance.  Lee Iacocca

All progress begins one step at a time.
There is no sudden lead to greatness.
Good work, done little by little becomes great work.
The house of success is built brick by brick.

You can do what you want to do, achieve what you want to achieve,
attain any reasonable objective you may have in mind.
Not all of a sudden, nor in one sweeping act of achievement.
You will do it gradually, day by day and play by play.

If you want to do it, if you work to do it,
you will accomplish your goal over a sufficient period of time.

Your big accomplishments will be a series of little accomplishments.
It takes many strokes to overthrow the tallest oak.

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Posted in Diary Entry, family, Health, job, life, Love, motivation, romance, Weight loss, work | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SET GOALS AND ACT ON YOUR DREAMS

Posted by 104Inc.com on December 2, 2008

Make your life a mission-not an intermission.  Arnold H. Glasgow

Your present situation doesn’t determine where you can go,
it merely determines where you’re starting.

The purpose of a goal is to focus your attention on your future.
Real magic begins when you set that goal.

Your power to accomplish anything becomes a reality when you have a goal.
Your mind will stretch toward achievement when it has a clear objective.

A goal gives you a place to start and a final destination.

You’ll achieve the success you seek, if you focus the full power
of all you are on what you have a burning desire to achieve.

Set goals, Act on those dreams and they are yours.

Posted in Diary Entry, job, life, motivation, Personal Finance, Weight loss, work | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

OPPORTUNITY LIES IN THE MIDST OF DIFFICULTY

Posted by 104Inc.com on November 13, 2008

Failure is only the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.  Henry Ford 

Every problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful
that it literally dwarfs the problem.
The greatest success stories were created by people
who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity.

You’ll find that every situation properly perceived
offers you opportunity.
As fast as each opportunity presents itself, use it.

Successful people don’t achieve their distinction by having
some new talent or opportunity presented to them.
They developed an opportunity that was at hand.

You must make your own opportunities if you want to be successful.
They are all around you.

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A Hard Worker Knows That He Has Much To Be Grateful For

Posted by 104Inc.com on November 5, 2008

A Hard worker knows that he has much to be grateful for.

He was helped in his struggle by the angels; celestial forces placed each thing in its place, thus allowing him to give of his best.  His companions say: ‘He’s so lucky!’ And the hard worker does sometimes achieve things far beyond his capabilities.  That is why, at sunset, he kneels and gives thanks for the Protective Cloak surrounding him.

His gratitude, however, is not limited to the spiritual world; he never forgets his friends, for their blood mingled with his on the battlefield.  A hard worker does not need to be reminded of the help given him by others; he is the first to remember and he makes sure to share with them any rewards he receives.

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Posted in Advertising, Business, Diary Entry, economy, Health, life, Love, motivation, Online Business, Personal Finance, Politics, Travel, Weight loss | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

To succeed at selling: Questions and probes

Posted by 104Inc.com on October 20, 2008

Seeks information to understand situations, needs, and desired potential benefits.

To succeed at selling, you need to sell to customers’ needs. How do you find out about these needs? Research the industries your customers are in. Then confirm the information you gather by asking questions. Studies show that asking questions is the most powerful way to persuade.

 

 

1. Do your homework.
Know as much as possible about your customer’s industry, the products and services they provide, the challenges they face, and the business needs they’re striving to achieve–before you walk in the door. Locate this information through:

 

 

  • Online or offline databases
  • The Internet or your company’s intranet.
  • Newspapers, magazines, journals, trade publications, annual reports, and other sources of business data.
  • Business directories.
  • Professional organizations.
  • People within the organization who report to the customer. These “gatekeepers” can include receptionists, assistants, or junior people from associated departments.

Think about the information that will help you learn more about your customer’s situation and needs. For example:

  • What is the customer’s buying criteria? (Criteria might include service, price, and quality.)
  • Is there a problem or concern that needs to be addressed? How critical is it? In which area(s) does it have the biggest effect?
  • What are the customer’s time frames for making a purchasing decision?
  • Is the customer considering any of your competitors? Which ones? Why?

Anticipate problems your customer might be experiencing. Before you meet with the customer, identify how your products and services can solve those problems.
2. Ask questions.
Ask questions to clarify the customer’s situation and needs. There are four types of questions that are critical.
 
 
 
Basic Fact Questions. The answers to these questions reveal specific information about the buyer and his or her business.

Examples:

  • How many operations like this does your organization have around the world?
  • How many people are employed at this plant?
  • What are your plans for growth over the next five years?

By doing your homework, you can answer many basic fact questions. Be selective about the number of these questions you ask customers. People are busy and, in many cases, don’t have time to educate you on the basic facts about their business. Seek only clarification of information that is not obvious or readily understood.

Problem Questions. These questions surface problems that the customer is experiencing. Their purpose is to help you:

  • Better understand the customer’s concerns or dissatisfaction with the current product or service.
  • Identify how your products and services might solve the problem.

Examples:

  • What problems are you experiencing with your present system?
  • Why do you think the process is so inefficient?
  • What quality or reliability problems are you experiencing?

Consequence Questions. Often, asking problem questions will get the customer interested in your product or service. Sometimes, however, you need to increase the size of the problem in the customer’s mind to promote interest. Asking about the consequences of problems “builds the pain” of the customer’s current situation.

Examples:

  • How will the problems you’re experiencing with your present system affect productivity?
  • To what extent do your process inefficiencies translate into opportunities for your competition?
  • What kind of turnover or training costs are you incurring because of your situation?

Asking hypothetical questions drives home the need for a solution–especially in the minds of your customers. If they didn’t recognize the extent to which a problem could damage individuals or the organization, they will now.

Benefit Questions. These questions surface the usefulness or benefit of implementing your product or service. By asking questions that let customers tell you the value of your solution, you ultimately allow them to convince themselves of the need for your product or service.

Examples:

  • How would it help to have online diagnostics?
  • What advantages would you gain from a software package that requires very little training to use effectively?
  • Is there any other benefit of eliminating this problem?

The key to successful sales calls is preparation. When planning your next sales call, write down questions that you need to ask your customer. Consider each category–basic fact, problem, consequence, and benefit–and plan your call around asking those types of questions.

 

Keep in mind that when making a purchasing decision, a customer must answer the question, “Is the problem big enough to justify this solution?” Therefore, you must ask several problem and consequence questions. This will raise awareness in the customer’s mind that the current situation and needs are serious enough to warrant buying your solution.

 

Posted in Advertising, motivation, Online Business, Sales Training | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »