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Archive for February 25th, 2009

Take Your Ad Out of the Yellowpages and Save a Bundle!

Posted by 104Inc.com on February 25, 2009

Take your ad out of the yellowpages and save a bundle. Actually, there’s a bit more to say, but most of my customers usually did just that before coming to see me. You see, I counsele 1000’s of clients during my years as a marketing consultant. So, during a recession, customers would ask to cut or remove their ads entirely. Hey, it made perfect sense to them. When business is good, advertise. When it’s bad, don’t. They also probably buy high and sell low in the stock market, too.

I understand that a slow cash flow is hard to cope with and the first inclination is to cut out the overhead. Unfortunately, they think of advertising as overhead. I considered it an extra salesperson that never slept, needed no health benefits, but always worked hard to bring in business. It was tough to convince my customers to stop dumping money in the yellowpages and start getting more for less.  Advertising should be the last thing to go especially if you can cut cost and get more leads in the process. Now doesn’t that sound like a win-win?

But invariably some businesses will still remove advertising and hope things would get better on their own. Amazingly, when I see them the following year, things weren’t any better and often, worse. They couldn’t comprehend what was happening, so I tried to explain the situation.

I would start with, “You just made your competitors very happy.” The business owner would look startled. “Why is that?” they might ask. “Because,” I reply, “you aren’t in the yellowpages anymore and that’s great but did you replace it with a lower cost and more effective alternative?  No. So when a consumer’s water heater dies and they go searching for a plumber, the other plumbers are there and you aren’t. They get to benefit from less competition. So, even though they pay for the ad, it works better when there are less ads. You did them a favor. I hoped they thanked you.”

Sure, the poor times might cause you to drop the color or reduce a size, but dropping the ad is not the way to help yourself when every customer becomes even more precious. There are other ways to beef up the results of your ad without spending more. In fact, I’ve had some clients spend less and still maintain a successful advertising program. It’s all about the little things and how they are handled. Haven’t you brought your car into the shop for a tune-up? Well, I bet it’s time to trade in that old and dusty yellowpages ad and 104inc.com is your neighborhood low cost and high impact advertising source. They will show you how to create a headline that works and create a slimmer and trimmer ad that can compete for more business. Also, 104inc.com will help you track the results of the ads so you know exactly how it’s doing.

Give your ad a makeover and take it out for a test run with a 45 Day FREE Trial. In a poor or good economy, your advertising can help you bring in customers, if it’s well thought out and created with your business in mind.

 

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Posted in Advertising, Business, Business Finance, economy, Free Trial, marketing, Online Business, Online Discounts, Sales Training, success, work | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

THERE ARE NO EASY ROADS TO SUCCESS

Posted by 104Inc.com on February 25, 2009

No one has a corner on success.
Pay the price for it and it’s yours.
 
No matter what you want from life you’ve got to give up something to get it.
 
Nothing worthwhile will come easily to you.
Hard work will accomplish results that last.
You’ve got to work a great deal harder than most people to get it.
 
There is no success at bargain basement prices.
 
The highway to success is a toll road.
Everything has a price.

Posted in Business, Diary Entry, Diet, family, Health, job, life, Love, motivation, Online Business, Online Discounts, success, work | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Obama address renews audacity to hope

Posted by 104Inc.com on February 25, 2009

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama gave America the audacity to hope again.

After describing the U.S. economy in nearly apocalyptic terms for weeks, pushing his $787 billion stimulus plan through Congress, the president used his address to Congress on Tuesday night to tap the deep well of American optimism — the never-say-die spirit that every president tries to capture in words. And great presidents embody.

“We will rebuild. We will recover, and the United States of America will emerge stronger than before,” Obama said, echoing Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan.

“The answers to our problems don’t lie beyond our reach,” Obama said. “What is required now is for this country is to pull together, confront boldly the challenges we face, and take responsibility for our future once more.”

The themes of responsibility, accountability and, above all, national community rang throughout an address carefully balanced by the gravity of its times. Job losses. Home foreclosures. Credit crisis. Rising health care costs. Declining trust in government. Obama touched all those bases.

“The impact of this recession is real, and it is everywhere,” he said.

It seemed that the president might be sticking to the dour talking points of the stimulus debate, when he warned that failure to pass the legislation would lead to a catastrophe “as deep and dire as any since the Great Depression,” one that “we may be unable to reverse.”

Fearing (and hearing) the worst, Americans supported Obama’s package and lawmakers passed it. But his rhetoric carried a risk.

None other than former President Bill Clinton, husband of Obama’s former rival and now the secretary of state, Hillary Rodham Clinton, complained that the president’s words were too much of a downer. The president from Hope, Ark., told the author of “The Audacity of Hope” to get back on message.

“I just want the American people to know that he’s confident that we are going to get out of this and he feels good about the long run,” Clinton told ABC’s “Good Morning America” last Friday.

Obama didn’t need Clinton’s advice. While his advisers privately criticized Clinton for second-guessing their strategy, Obama said a president must be both a realist and a cheerleader. “I’m constantly trying to thread the needle between sounding alarmist but also letting the American people know the circumstances that we’re in,” Obama told ABC News on Feb. 10.

Indeed, advisers said at the time that Obama had already written much of his address, and they predicted that it would mark a rhetorical pivot — from selling fear to raising hopes.

And that he did.

“You should also know,” Obama told millions of viewers Tuesday night, “that the money you’ve deposited in banks across the country is safe; your insurance is secure; you can rely on the continued operation of our financial system.”

He sounded like Roosevelt who, after closing banks briefly in the first days of his presidency, stoked the embers of American optimism. “Confidence and courage are the essentials of success in carrying out our plan,” Roosevelt said. “Let us unite in banishing fear. We have provided the machinery to restore our financial system. It is up to you to support and make it work. It is your problem no less than it is mine. Together we cannot fail.”

Like Roosevelt, Obama asked Americans to unite against pessimism. “We are a nation that has seen promise amid peril, and claimed opportunity from ordeal,” Obama said. “Now we must be that nation again.”

Like Roosevelt, Obama said his government had already provided the machinery to create jobs, improve access to health care, free up credit and help struggling homeowners.

And, like Roosevelt, he challenged Americans to help fix the nation’s woes. Obama even challenged his fellow citizens to recognize their role in creating the problem. “People bought homes they knew they couldn’t afford,” Obama said, “from banks and lenders who pushed those bad loans anyway.”

He was blunt but bullish on America.

“None of this will come without cost, nor will it be easy,” he said after spelling out his agenda. “But this is America. We don’t do what’s easy. We do what is necessary to move this country forward.”

In short, he reminded people that America has always seen itself as a “shining city upon a hill,” as one of its earliest leaders, John Winthrop, put it — a metaphor that Ronald Reagan reintroduced effectively in the 1980s.

When he addressed Congress, Reagan liked to pepper the audience with average people who did extraordinary things and epitomized the American spirit. Obama borrowed that device, inviting Ty’Sheoma Bethea to join first lady Michelle Obama in the crowd.

Bethea is an eighth-grade student who wrote Congress for help in repairing her dilapidated school, telling lawmakers that she and her fellow students will rise above their conditions because, “We are not quitters.”

And that was Obama’s bottom-line message to a shaken nation. We are not quitters.

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